A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon Limited Edition with Enamel Dial

A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon Limited Edition with Enamel Dial

The 1815 Tourbillon by A. Lange & Söhne is one of those watches that, at first, keeps its cards all around covered up. With the exception of the tourbillon noticeable at 6 o’clock, it remains incredibly circumspect. Be that as it may, when it was presented four years ago , it appeared to be a watch packed with astute mechanisms. Something else under the surface the eye, they say. This exactness timekeeping instrument, which features several patented gadgets, is currently offered in another restricted release with another dial that indeed discreetly sets the tone. Meet the new A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon with Enamel Dial.

It isn’t the initially restricted version delivered by A. Lange & Söhne to be based on the 1815 Tourbillon. Back in 2015, the Saxon brand presented a “Handwerkskunst” variant of this watch with tremblage dial and an eminently decorated development. Substantially more flamboyant than the form that we’re introducing today. The 2018 restricted version is, in fact, visually all about tact, however with beautiful materials – the genuine meaning of extravagance, on the off chance that you ask us. Before we move to this 1815 Tourbillon Enamel Dial in details, let’s take a more critical gander at the model itself.

Patented features of the 1815 Tourbillon

The 1815 Tourbillon was presented back at the SIHH 2014. What appeared first as a straightforward mechanical advancement of the brand’s most classic watch – it might have quite recently featured the addition of a tourbillon regulator – was, in fact, a considerably more technical creation. On the off chance that visually the watch was just recognized by its opening on the dial at 6 o’clock, it concealed two extremely intriguing patented gadgets, with a solid spotlight on exactness – which is, after all, the main goal of a tourbillon watch.

Precision isn’t just about regulation here yet about setting and adjusting the watch. The first of these gadgets is the Zero-Reset mechanism, first presented in 1997 on the Langematik. This mechanism allows resetting the seconds hands to the zero position when pulling the crown – along these lines, allowing for an adjustment of the opportunity to the nearest second. The second gadget to be featured on this 1815 Tourbillon was the stop-seconds mechanism for the tourbillon – a gadget patented in 2007. Both were combined without precedent for a solitary watch in 2014 when ALS launched the 1815 Tourbillon.

In request to understand how these two gadgets work, please take a glance at the video below.

The new A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon Enamel Dial

This year, A. Lange & Söhne releases another restricted version of the 1815 Tourbillon. This isn’t the first occasion when that this watch is created in a restricted run, as we’ve seen with the  “Handwerkskunst”  model, as well as the platinum model reference 730.025 that is as yet advertised on ALS’ site (also a 100-piece production).

What’s new with the current model? Compared to the 730.025, it shares the same material, meaning that it is crafted in 950 platinum, sharing the same understated look. The case has the same completions for its surfaces – for the most part cleaned with a brushed caseband – and it measures the same diameter, at 39.5mm. What changes is the tallness of the case, that moves from 11.10mm to 11.30mm, to accommodate a somewhat thicker dial than the standard dial made of strong silver.

The 1815 Tourbillon Reference 730.079F features another dial made of white enamel. The applied material requires a tad more space. Such dials are complex to produce. Enamel is capricious and can’t be rushed. The interaction takes several days, during which the various advances have to be repeated again and again. The consideration of even the smallest particle of residue or soil would mar the flawless surface and the dial would should be created again from scratch.

Compared to the strong silver adaptation, apart from the conspicuous white tone and gleaming surface, the A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon Enamel Dial also shows a couple of contrasts, for example, the flat dial – not ventured any more – and a red 12 list – a gesture to ancient pocket watches of the brand. On this model, the hands are blued steel. The one-minute tourbillon, suspended beneath a black cleaned connect with heavenly decoration, is obvious through a cut in the dial at 6 o’clock.

The development is noticeable through the sapphire caseback. Apart from the technical focuses explained at the start of this article, this Calibre L102.1 is also brilliantly decorated with all the usual Lange features: gems in screwed gold chatons, meager stripes on the scaffolds, cleaned inclined angles, hand-engraved cockerel connect and even a diamond endstone for the tourbillon’s axis. This hand-wound development ticks at 21,600vph and can amass to 72 hours of energy.

The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon Enamel Dial is conveyed on a black hand-sewed alligator leather strap with a deployment lock in platinum. It will be created in 100 pieces, individually numbered on the caseback. Cost is EUR 198,000. More details on www.alange-soehne.com .